Dr. Bray Links

Monday, December 10, 2018

Even When Not In Rome, Eat A Mediterranean Diet To Cut Heart Disease Risk | Kaiser Health News

Once again, your mother was right. You really do need to eat your vegetables. And while you are at it, put down the bacon and pick up the olive oil, because new research supports the contention that switching to a Mediterranean diet could significantly decrease the risk of heart disease.

According to a study published Friday in JAMA Network Open, people who followed this type of diet had 25 percent less risk of developing cardiovascular disease over the course of 12 years.

https://khn.org/news/even-when-not-in-rome-eat-a-mediterranean-diet-to-cut-heart-disease-risk/

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Association of Frequency of Organic Food Consumption With Cancer Risk

Results  Among 68 946 participants (78.0% female; mean [SD] age at baseline, 44.2 [14.5] years), 1340 first incident cancer cases were identified during follow-up, with the most prevalent being 459 breast cancers, 180 prostate cancers, 135 skin cancers, 99 colorectal cancers, 47 non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and 15 other lymphomas. High organic food scores were inversely associated with the overall risk of cancer (hazard ratio for quartile 4 vs quartile 1, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.63-0.88; P for trend = .001; absolute risk reduction, 0.6%; hazard ratio for a 5-point increase, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.88-0.96).

Conclusions and Relevance  A higher frequency of organic food consumption was associated with a reduced risk of cancer. If these findings are confirmed, further research is necessary to determine the underlying factors involved in this association.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2707948

Ultraviolet and Vitamin D

Reptiles need UVB for biosynthesis of vitamin D, and other metabolic processes. Specifically cholecalciferol (vitamin D3), which is needed to for basic cellular / neural functioning as well as the utilization calcium for bone and egg production. The UVA wavelength is also visible to many reptiles and might play a signifiant role in their ability survive in the wild as well as visual communication between individuals. Therefore, in a typical reptile enclosure, a fluorescent UV a/b source (at the proper strength / spectrum for the species), must be available for many captive species to survive. Simple supplementation with cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3) will not be enough as there's a complete biosynthetic pathway that is "leapfrogged" (risks of possible overdoses), the intermediate molecules and metabolites also place important functions in the animals health. Natural sunlight in the right levels is always going to be superior to artificial sources, but this might be possible for keepers in different parts of the world. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraviolet

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

The acute and chronic effects of hot water immersion on inflammation and metabolism in sedentary, overweight adults

Regular exercise-induced acute inflammatory responses are suggested to improve the inflammatory profile and insulin sensitivity. As body temperature elevations partly mediate this response, passive heating might be a viable tool to improve the inflammatory profile. This study investigated the acute, and chronic effects of hot water immersion on inflammatory and metabolic markers. Ten sedentary, overweight males (BMI: 31.0±4.2 kg/m2) were immersed in water set at 39°C for 1 h (HWI) or rested for 1 h at ambient temperature (AMB). Venous blood was obtained prior to, immediately post and 2 h post-session for assessment of monocyte intracellular heat shock protein 72 (iHsp72) and plasma concentrations of extracelullar heat shock protein 72 (eHsp72), interleukin-6 (IL-6), fasting glucose, insulin and nitrite. Thereafter, participants underwent a 2-week intervention period, consisting of 10 hot water immersion sessions (INT). Eight BMI-matched participants (BMI: 30.0±2.5 kg/m2) were included as control (CON). Plasma IL-6 and nitrite concentrations were higher immediately following HWI compared to AMB (IL-6 p<0.001, HWI: 1.37±0.94 to 2.51±1.49 pg/ml; nitrite p=0.04, HWI: 271±52 to 391±72 nM), while iHsp72 expression was unchanged (p=0.57). In contrast to resting iHsp72 expression (p=0.59), fasting glucose (p=0.04, INT: 4.44±0.93 to 3.98±0.98 mmol/l), insulin (p=0.04, INT: 68.1±44.6 to 55.0±29.9 pmol/l) and eHsp72 (p=0.03, INT: 17±41% reduction) concentrations were lowered after INT compared to CON. HWI induced an acute inflammatory response and increased nitric oxide bioavailability. The reductions in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations following the chronic intervention suggest that hot water immersion may serve as a tool to improve glucose metabolism.

https://www.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/japplphysiol.00407.2018

Sunday, December 2, 2018

Patients Often Withhold Information From Providers

The most common situations in which information was withheld were not agreeing with the clinician's recommendation (MTurk, 45.7%; SSI, 31.4%) and not understanding the clinician's instructions (MTurk, 31.8%; SSI, 24.3%).

The five reasons most commonly indicated for participants not disclosing information were not wanting to be judged or lectured (MTurk, 81.8%; SSI, 64.1%), not wanting to hear how harmful their behavior is (MTurk, 75.7%; SSI, 61.1%), embarrassment (MTurk, 60.9%; SSI, 49.9%), not wanting the clinician to think they were difficult patients (MTurk, 50.8%; SSI, 38.1%), and not wanting to take up more of the clinician's time (MTurk, 45.2%; SSI, 35.9%).

"If patients are withholding information from clinicians as frequently as this research suggests, then clinicians are routinely not receiving the information that they need to provide high quality care to patients, especially sicker patients," the researchers conclude. They note that sicker patients were more likely to withhold information.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/905825

Saturday, December 1, 2018

A novel hypothesis for atherosclerosis as a cholesterol sulfate deficiency syndrome

Worldwide geographical data show an inverse relationship between cardiovascular disease and annual sunlight availability [18]. In a study conducted in the British Isles, 49 % of the variance in mortality from coronary heart disease was accounted for by mean annual sunshine hours as measured by the Meteorological Office [19]. However, placebo-controlled trials failed to show any benefit from vitamin D3 supplementation [20]. We propose that the benefit comes from Ch-S synthesis instead. In [16], it was proposed that the protein endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), along with sunlight, catalyzes sulfate production in erythrocytes, endothelial cells, platelets and keratinocytes in the skin. Thus, eNOS is a dual-purpose enzyme, producing sulfate when it is membrane–bound and producing nitric oxide when it is free in the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the overuse of sunscreen has played a dual damaging role not only because sunlight catalysis is suppressed but also because the aluminum found in high-SPF sunscreens as an emulsifier actively disrupts eNOS' function [21]. eNOS is an orphan cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme [22], and aluminum is a known disruptor of CYP enzyme function through its displacement of the iron in the heme group [23]. Many other environmental toxicants also disrupt CYP enzymes, including mercury [24, 25], arsenic [26], cadmium [24], glyphosate [27, 28], and lead [25, 29].

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4456713/