Dr. Bray Links

Friday, September 14, 2018

Nutrition Training for Young Doctors Lacks Bite

The survey of the 133 US medical schools with 4-year MD programs in 2012 showed that medical students received a median of 16 hours of nutritional education that year—roughly the same as in 2000, 2004, and 2008.[1] Meanwhile, the percentage of US medical schools that do not require medical students to receive any instruction about nutrition increased from 5% in 2000 to 10% in 2012. Only around 1 in 4 medical schools have a required nutrition course.

Typically, in the first 2 years of med school, students learn about the molecular structures of vitamins and metabolites, Dr Kohlmeier said. However, teaching students about "the structure of Krebs-cycle metabolites," for example, "doesn't teach them anything about diabetes."

"Fewer than one half of all US medical schools offer any kind of clinical focus on nutrition—no rounds, no clinics—which reflects the reality in a lot of these teaching hospitals," Dr Kohlmeier observed. "Even in those that offer something, the average is in the range of 5 hours at most, which is not enough."

Students are not getting practice in "making patient assessments or understanding which patients are at risk from malnutrition before or after surgery," nor are they learning how to help motivate patients to lose weight.


https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/886722

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.