Dr. Bray Links

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Why petroleum jelly may not be the best thing to heal cuts - BBC News

Prof Ariens said: "We did laboratory and animal studies which showed this film could be a barrier against microbial infection for at least 12 hours, and this gives the immune system time to get white blood cells to the wound to counteract any infection."

Adding petroleum jelly perforated the protective film.

Prof Ariens said: "If you get a scrape or a cut it is best to let it clot for half an hour to let the film form. Do clean it of course if it needs it, but the clot will make its own perfect plaster. After that, it might not be so bad to add petroleum jelly, but before then, from our findings, it appears to damage this film."

Independent wound care advisor Jacqui Fletcher, who is also the clinical editor of the journal Wound UK, said: "You do see it used in sports. Boxing is a good example. If the fighter gets a cut they can use it to stop the blood running down the their face so that they can continue the fight. 

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-44600618

Monday, June 25, 2018

The effects of micronutrient deficiencies on bacterial species from the human gut microbiota

Vitamin and mineral (micronutrient) deficiencies afflict 2 billion people. Although the impact of these imbalances on host biology has been studied extensively, much less is known about their effects on the gut microbiota of developing or adult humans. Therefore, we established a community of cultured, sequenced human gut-derived bacterial species in gnotobiotic mice and fed the animals a defined micronutrient-sufficient diet, followed by a derivative diet devoid of vitamin A, folate, iron, or zinc, followed by return to the sufficient diet. Acute vitamin A deficiency had the largest effect on bacterial community structure and metatranscriptome, with Bacteroides vulgatus, a prominent responder, increasing its abundance in the absence of vitamin A. Applying retinol selection to a library of 30,300 B. vulgatus transposon mutants revealed that disruption of acrR abrogated retinol sensitivity. Genetic complementation studies, microbial RNA sequencing, and transcription factor-binding assays disclosed that AcrR is a repressor of an adjacent AcrAB-TolC efflux system. Retinol efflux measurements in wild-type and acrR-mutant strains plus treatment with a pharmacologic inhibitor of the efflux system revealed that AcrAB-TolC is a determinant of retinol and bile acid sensitivity in B. vulgatus Acute vitamin A deficiency was associated with altered bile acid metabolism in vivo, raising the possibility that retinol, bile acid metabolites, and AcrAB-TolC interact to influence the fitness of B. vulgatus and perhaps other microbiota members. This type of preclinical model can help to develop mechanistic insights about the effects of, and more effective treatment strategies for micronutrient deficiencies.

Combo antibiotic found inferior for MDR bloodstream infections | CIDRAP

The results of a large, international randomized trial indicate that the use of a combination therapy being investigated as a potential alternative to carbapenem antibiotics should be avoided in patients with certain multidrug-resistant bloodstream infections (BSIs), because of increased risk of mortality.

The findings of the MERINO Trial, presented this week at the 28th annual European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ECCMID), showed that the combination antibiotic piperacillin/tazobactam is inferior to meropenem for treating BSIs caused by third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae. The number of patients on piperacillin/tazobactam who died at the 30-day mark was more than three times the number who died in the meropenem arm.

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2018/04/combo-antibiotic-found-inferior-mdr-bloodstream-infections