Dr. Bray Links

Monday, January 8, 2018

Many Adults With Arthritis Not Receiving Exercise Counseling

"[T]he prevalence of counseling remains low for a self-managed behavior (exercise) with proven benefits and few risks, especially among those who are inactive. Various strategies such as health care provider education and training in exercise counseling and electronic medical record prompts might increase health care provider counseling for exercise among adults with arthritis," Jennifer Hootman, PhD, from the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia, and colleagues write.

Approximately 54 million Americans have arthritis. Many of these people also have common comorbidities, such as diabetes, heart disease, and obesity, for which exercise is recommended to improve disease control.  However, arthritis pain can be a barrier to exercise for people with these conditions.

At the same time, exercise can decrease the pain of arthritis. The American College of Rheumatology recommends exercise as first-line nonmedication therapy for managing osteoarthritis symptoms. One of the goals of the Healthy People 2020 initiative is to increase counseling about the benefits of exercise for people with arthritis.


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