Dr. Bray Links

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Nickel allergy: How to avoid exposure and reduce symptoms | American Academy of Dermatology

Avoid foods containing nickel if you are extremely sensitive to nickel. Some foods that contain high amounts of nickel include soy products—such as soybeans, soy sauce, and tofu—licorice, buckwheat, cocoa powder, clams, cashews, and figs.

https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/rashes/nickel-allergy

Frame Materials and Metal Allergies

The most common cause of metal allergies is mercury, and this is followed by metals including nickel, cobalt, tin, palladium and chrome.Conversely, metals such as gold, titanium, silver and iron are less likely to produce allergic reactions since they rarely dissolve upon contact with perspiration or other bodily fluids.

Of the metals most likely to produce allergic reactions, nickel is the one that is most commonly used in spectacle frames. For a long time, nickel has been used in the form of an alloy as a material for spectacle frames and is also used as the base plating material for plating and gold plating, for example. 

Compared with other metals, the properties of nickel make it readily dissolvable, and this means that contact of the body with nickel will result in the metal beginning to dissolve due to the effect of sodium ions in perspiration, causing an allergic reaction.

However, as a recent measure to prevent allergic reactions, the materials used in many products on the market nowadays are nickel-free. In addition, frames with vinyl-covered temples are now available for people with metal allergies.

People who may have metal allergies are recommended to undergo a patch test at a dermatologist. Forearmed with knowledge of which metals are likely to cause an allergic reaction, you will know which metals to avoid when purchasing spectacles.

http://seikoeyewear.com/eye-information/about-frames/materials-metal-allegries

Nickel Allergies on Rise as Devices Meet Skin - NYTimes.com

Nickel, one of the most common allergens in the United States, can be found in things like hand-held devices and jewelry. But unlike Europe, the United States has no restrictions on its widespread use in consumer products. That worries some doctors who say that the growing use of mobile and hand-held devices combined with a lack of regulatory oversight could lead to a spike in allergic reactions.

"I am absolutely concerned about it," said Stephen P. Stone, the director of clinical research in dermatology at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine and the former president of the American Academy of Dermatology.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 10 to 20 percent of the population is allergic to nickel. The reactions can be unpleasant, but not fatal. Typically they include blistering, redness and dry skin.



https://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/08/21/technology/personaltech/nickel-allergies-on-rise-as-devices-meet-skin.html?referer=https://duckduckgo.com/

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Fire Retardants Found in Furniture and Gym Mats Implicated in Infertility

PFRs are commonly added to polyurethane foam, gym mats and baby items such as car seats, ostensibly to reduce the risk of the items catching fire. However, the chemicals do not remain in these items. They spread, contaminating air and dust. They can also migrate through direct contact. One 2015 study13 found nearly every dust sample collected from American homes contained the flame retardants Tris phosphate and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP).

Ninety-one percent of urine samples from the residents also contained metabolites of Tris phosphate, and 83 percent had metabolites of TPHP. Disturbingly, toddlers have been found to have levels of flame retardants that are as much as five times higher than their mother's.14 Needless to say, bioaccumulation can have serious health consequences over the course of a lifetime, and may ultimately affect the reproductive capacity of coming generations.


http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2017/09/08/flame-retardants-health-effects.aspx

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Exposure to Disinfectants Linked to COPD

This was a "well-performed study," said Lidwien Smit, PhD, from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. "I just wonder about the pathology, and how it influences the microbiome."

"Disinfectants are meant to kill off bacteria, but if you're exposed to large concentrations, you're also inhaling them, which could affect your airway microbes," she explained.

In fact, disinfectants could play a role in killing off bacterial communities in the airways that are responsible for "immune homeostasis" and keep users healthy, she added.

If that immune balance gets disturbed, it might have an influence on a person's reaction to pathogens or inflammation. "This is all part of the COPD pathology — that could be another interesting hypothesis to study," Dr Smit told Medscape Medical News.

Dr Dumas is clear that this is preliminary observational research and more studies are needed. Determining which agents are most harmful "would help define guidelines to protect workers," she noted.

The current findings do not show that the disinfectants are a direct cause of COPD, but they do draw an association between some disinfectants and development of the disease. "I hope this study will help open the discussion for better guidelines," Dr Dumas said.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/885575

Saturday, September 2, 2017

The Unexpected and Troubling Rise of Candida auris

Hello. I am Dr Tom Chiller, chief of the Mycotic Diseases Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As part of the CDC Expert Commentary Series on Medscape, I would like to tell you about Candida auris, a novel yeast that is behaving in unexpected and concerning ways, causing severe disease in countries across the globe, including the United States. Today we'll share how you can protect your patients from this potentially deadly infection, the history of this unusual bug, and how the United States is working with global partners to combat its spread.


http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/884470