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Monday, March 6, 2017

Replacement Chemical In BPA-Free Bottles Also Disrupts Estrogen In The Body



Due to public pressure -- and bans in a few countries -- many manufacturers have started replacing BPA. However, recent investigations have shown that Bisphenol A isn't the only endocrine disrupting chemical consumers should be worried about. According to an article published in the US News and World Report, chemical substitute BPS, an endocrine disrupting hormone with traits very similar to BPA, is present in BPA-Free products and is inside paper money, cash register receipts and most plastic consumer products much like its predecessor.

Widespread human exposure to BPS was confirmed in a 2012 analysis of urine samples taken in the U.S., Japan, China and five other Asian countries.

BPS has some of the same estrogen-mimicking effects of BPA , and that people may now be absorbing 19 times more BPS through their skin than when BPA was used to coat paper.

Not only does BPS appear to have similar hormone-mimicking characteristics to BPA, but research suggests it is actually significantly less biodegradable, and more heat-stable and photo-resistant, than BPA.

Another substitute, fluorene-9-bisphenol, or BHPF, is already widely used in a variety of materials. But Jianying Hu of Peking University in Beijing and her team have found that BHPF also binds to the body's oestrogen receptors. Unlike BPA, it does this without stimulating them, instead blocking their normal activity. In tests on female mice, BHPF caused the animals to have smaller wombs and smaller pups than controls, and in some cases miscarriages.

In recent years, BHPF has shown up in all sorts of adhesives and plastic materials--everywhere from the aerospace and automobile industry to coatings used to protect floors. "So we are interested in the human exposure and risk due to the usage of BHPF," Hu said.

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