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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

New toothpaste formula said to fix cracked teeth, restore tooth enamel

If you are trying to avoid undergoing the dentist's drill and exposing your body to dangerous cavity fillings, a revolutionary new toothpaste could be the ideal solution. The toothpaste, which is made using components that mimic your tooth's natural enamel, builds up in the cracks in teeth. The chemical, known as crystalline calcium phosphate, works by diluting the acid on the tooth's surface. After a few minutes, it crystallizes and adheres itself to the structure of the tooth's natural enamel. It can also combat bacteria.

The toothpaste was developed by Japanese scientist Dr. Kazue Yamagishi of the FAP Dental Institute. It is easy to apply at home, and its liquid form enables it to reach the smallest areas of the teeth. Some experiments show that teeth that have been treated using the paste are identical to healthy teeth, while cavities that are filled with it have been found to be every bit as sturdy as their metal counterparts.

This is a remarkably better solution than the traditional method of filling cavities, which entails removing decaying parts of the teeth and then applying a filling. It's particularly useful in the case of newly emerging cavities, as too much healthy tooth needs to be removed for the filling to stick. If ignored, however, the bacteria in these tiny cavities can destroy the tooth's enamel and lead to deeper cavities, possibly even necessitating crowns or root canals.
Traditional dental treatments have tremendous shortcomings

According to Dr. Yamagishi, around 60 percent of dental therapy entails the re-treatment of teeth that have already undergone previous dental procedures. This, she points out, is because the metal alloys and resins used in fillings are different from the tooth's natural composition, leading to decay at the point of contact. This is why regenerating tooth enamel is an ideal approach that should help lead to reduction of tooth decay.

A study of the toothpaste's efficacy was published in Nature in 2005, and Dr. Yamagishi's website states that the product is expected to hit the market some time this year.

http://www.naturalnews.com/2016-12-07-new-toothpaste-formula-said-to-be-able-to-fix-cracked-teeth-restore-tooth-enamel.html

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