Dr. Bray Links

Friday, September 9, 2016

Migraine Prevention: Is There a Link to Vitamin Deficiency?

Past research demonstrated an association between adults and children with migraine disorders and vitamin deficiencies. However, there have been other studies that discounted this connection.13

The team, led by Dr. Suzanne Hagler, a headache medicine fellow in the division of neurology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital, evaluated over 7,400 participants.

Researchers took baseline levels of riboflavin, vitamin D, folate and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). A high percentage of the children, teens and young adults had mild CoQ10, vitamin D and riboflavin deficiencies.14

Interestingly, they found young women and girls were more likely to experience a CoQ10 deficiency and boys were more likely to suffer from vitamin D deficiency.15

Additionally, they discovered an association in women between migraines and cardiovascular disease and mortality. Participants suffering from chronic migraines at regular intervals had an increased risk of CoQ10 and riboflavin deficiency, compared to those with episodic migraines occurring at infrequent intervals.

Many of the patients in this study were also prescribed preventative therapy and too few were given just supplements for the researchers to determine if supplementation alone was enough to prevent migraines.16

The researchers found that an alarming 16 to 51 percent of participants had below average levels of vitamins depending on the vitamin tested.17

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/09/08/migraines-nutrient-deficiencies.aspx

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