Dr. Bray Links

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Saturated Fats Have No Link to Heart Disease



Now we can add yet another large study to this ever-growing list. The meta-analysis published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), found no association between high levels of saturated fat in the diet and heart disease.

Nor could they find an association between saturated fat consumption and other life-threatening diseases like stroke or type 2 diabetes.

However, the study DID find a disease link to trans fat consumption. As reported by Newsweek:
"[C]onsumption of trans unsaturated fats found in everyday supermarket goods such as margarine, processed cakes, and microwave popcorn can increase the risk of death from coronary heart disease (CHD) by 28 percent."
Trans fats also increased all-cause mortality by 34 percent. This is important because many "experts" frequently confuse trans fat with saturated fat intake.

Moreover, a pooled analysis of 11 studies showed that replacing saturated fat (found in foods like meat, egg yolks, dairy products, salmon, nuts, avocados, coconut oil, and olive oil) with monounsaturated fat (vegetable cooking oils), or carbohydrates (sugars and grains) raised the risk of non-fatal heart attacks.

...

Now she’s warning us that the vegetable oils many restaurants and food manufacturers are trading the trans fats in for may actually be more harmful than the trans fats! The reason for this is because when heated, they create highly toxic oxidation products, including aldehydes, which are extremely inflammatory.

So what’s the ideal fat to cook with?

Tallow and lard are two great options. Tallow is a hard fat that comes from cows. Lard is a hard fat that comes from pigs. They're both animal fats, and used to be the main fats used in cooking.

One of their benefits is that, since they're saturated fats, they do not oxidize when heated. And saturated fats do not have double bonds that can react with oxygen; therefore they cannot form dangerous aldehydes or other toxic oxidation products. Coconut oil is another healthy option, as it too resists oxidation when heated.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/08/31/saturated-fats-heart-disease.aspx

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