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Friday, May 1, 2015

Paleo Diet working for Jeb Bush's weight loss


Steak Tips Susanne, the $21 entree at the Hilton Garden Inn in Manchester, N.H., arrived as a carefully composed plate: strips of sirloin, sautéed peppers and caramelized onions atop a bed of linguine with a side of garlic bread.

Then the dish underwent the Jeb Bush treatment. The garlic bread was instantly banished to the plate of a nearby aide. The pasta was conspicuously pushed aside.

A sympathetic guest at the table, convinced that Mr. Bush, 62, could not possibly be sated, offered him a piece of her salmon.

Was it true, the guest asked him, that a stomach shrinks during a diet, easing the pangs of hunger? Not at all, Mr. Bush replied.

“I am always hungry,” he said.

Jeb Bush is thinking of running for president. And he is starving.

As he prepares to challenge an almost universally younger and svelter field of Republican rivals, Mr. Bush has adopted a weight-loss program that is melting away pounds at a staggering rate even as it inflicts an unhappy toll: regular bouts of dietary crankiness.

The monthslong experiment in deprivation — little to no starch, dairy or refined sugar, in adherence to the in-vogue Paleo diet — may seem extreme. But unlike a mountain-biking brother, and his still-trim nonagenarian father, Mr. Bush has long struggled to keep the pounds away, trying everything from climbing 22 flights of stairs a day to joining the low-carb Atkins craze of the early 2000s.

The rigid abstemiousness runs the risk of putting him at a dietary distance from an American electorate that still binges on carbohydrates and, after eight years of a tea-sipping president, craves a relatable eater in chief.

Breaking bread with Iowans? Try almonds, Mr. Bush’s preferred high-protein snack food.

Bonding over hamburgers in New Hampshire? How about salad with grilled chicken, his monotonous go-to lunch.

During a meeting with veterans in Colorado Springs a few days ago, a thick stack of pancakes was placed in front of Mr. Bush at an IHOP, along with a second platter of eggs, bacon and hash browns. The veterans dug in. Mr. Bush left his breakfast untouched, to the disappointment of the restaurant’s staff.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/25/us/politics/paleo-diet-in-and-pizza-out-a-slimmer-jeb-bush-seems-intent-on-staying-that-way.html

1 comment:

  1. Good for him.

    Personally, I think the Paleo diet is great. I am seeing and feeling the benefits of the diet for a long time now. Not only have I lost weight, but I feel much more energised, and much better in myself. I think the reason is that whilst the paleo diet may be a diet, I do actually eat much much varied food than I did previously. All I've done is taken out the stodge that my body finds hard to digest, and added more types of fruit, veg, and indeed meat.

    I've now actually taken an interest in cooking paleo meals, which I can guarentee is 100% better than throwing some ready meals in the oven like I used to.

    I'm just reviewed a cookbook that shows exactly this: http://cookbook-reviews.net/review-the-paleo-recipe-book/

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