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Saturday, November 29, 2014

What You Should Know About Histamine Intolerance - Chris Kresser


"You can get your diamine oxidase levels tested actually. It’s a serum test. So you can get diamine oxidase. You can get serum histamine tested. Serum tryptase, T-R-Y-P-T-A-S-E, is considered one of the most sensitive markers for mast cell activation syndrome. So you can run some tests, and that might be helpful in seeing where the problem lies. For example, if you run the test and your diamine oxidase levels are normal but your histamine is very high, that means that you may not have an issue with breaking down histamine. It may be more of an issue of overproduction of histamine due to gut dysbiosis, for example. In that case, fixing the gut and doing a low-histamine diet would probably be enough, without any additional intervention. However, if you get tested and your histamine levels are normal, but your diamine oxidase is really low, then that suggests you have possibly a genetic deficiency of diamine oxidase. And what’s probably going to help you more is to take diamine oxidase, which you can take as a supplement. Seeking Health sells it as Histamine Block. There’s also DAOSin, D-A-O-S-I-N, from Swanson. There’s Histame. They’re all basically the same thing. It’s actually taking diamine oxidase, the enzyme that breaks down histamine. You take it with meals. That can help a lot. Then there are some natural antihistamines that are probably a better idea for excess histamine production. Those include quercetin; bromelain, which is an enzyme; pine bark extract, which is also known as Pycnogenol. That’s pretty expensive, but it can be effective. Then there are, as I said, certain species of bacteria that break down histamine and certain species of bacteria that produce histamine. So Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, which are typically in yogurt and fermented dairy products, those are notorious histamine producers, which is why fermented dairy can be like kryptonite. Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium infantis are two histamine degraders. It’s quite difficult though to get Bifidobacterium infantis separately as an individual strain, without other strains that are also in it. But it is possible to get Lactobacillus plantarum that way, just as a single strain, pretty easily. So that can be a good one to take. Then soil-based organisms like Prescript-Assist, which I like for many other reasons. This is another reason that I like it. There’s not a lot of research on this, but my experience is that soil-based organisms tend to be neutral or even histamine-degrading. They tend to be tolerated pretty well by people with histamine issues."

http://chriskresser.com/what-you-should-know-about-histamine-intolerance

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